Tagged: auction house

A crafter should always know the value of his tools and materials. This is true for crafters making goods to skill up and for those creating items to sell on the auction house. Material value can be easily seen in the game by using the World of Warcraft addon LilSparky’s Workshop (LSW).

What is LilSparky’s Workshop?

Simply put: this addon calculates the cost to create an item and lists the item’s market price next to it. This is powerful information when determining what items to craft when attempting to make gold on the auction house. This addon supports auction house scanners AuctioneerAuctionLiteAuctionMaster, and Auctionator.

Configuring the AddOn

Assuming you have one of the four support scanners, LSW will start working right away with no configuration. It will modify any of the following trade skill interfaces:

If you right-click on the value or cost column, you can select auction, vendor, or disenchant pricing model. By default, the greatest value returned from the three models will be used for that item.

Using the AddOn

You should see both the value and cost columns in your trade skill interface. Your potential profit is the value of the crafted item, minus the cost. LSW formats the value text in bold for items with a profit greater than zero. I use AdvancedTradeSkillWindow (ATSW), and sort my craftables by “difficulty.” I can then eyeball items with a higher profit and make those while leveling a profession.

I haven’t found a way to use LSW and ATSW together to return items sorted by greatest potential profit first. Skillet, on the other hand, will allow you to sort by LSW values, including “LSW: Profit.” The ability to sort by profit is extremely helpful if you are mass producing items.

Download the AddOn

You can download LilSparky’s Workshop from WowAce. The current version as of this post is r138 (September 29, 2012). This addon is not current on Curse or Wowinterface.

Yesterday, I wrote an introduction on how to use The Undermine Journal‘s IQY data source for your gold-making strategies in World of Warcraft. Today, I’ll walk you through a scenario where I calculate the price point for Mists of Pandaria Darkmoon Faire cards.

Previously, I worked through the various calculations to determine a conservative herb milling-to-Darkmoon Faire card crafting rate. I figured that it takes about 212 MoP-level herbs to craft a single card. If you are buying herbs at or under market prices, you can then set your price for a potential, substantial profit when you list your card.

Create a Master Market Pricing File

To get started, generate an IQY file from the Undermine Journal and open it using Microsoft Excel. You will be prompted with a security notice, and it is your responsibility to understand what this means and allow/enable the security exception if you wish to proceed.

You should now have a new Excel workbook with a single worksheet that is populated with WoW auction house market price data. This will be your master market price data for all of your other workbooks. Now, save this workbook to your computer.

You will need to update this file manually in order to retrieve current market pricing, but if you link to it properly (as you’ll see below), then all of your other spreadsheet calculations will use current market prices instead of you having to search for them one at a time and enter them as static values.

How to Use the Master Market Pricing File in Your Formulas

Next, create a new Excel workbook, and type in an item name into a cell. The name must match the actual item name found in the game, or the search will fail. In another cell within the same row of the item name, type the following formula:

=VLOOKUP(<item name cell>, ‘[<pricing workbook file name>]<pricing workbook file name’s worksheet name>’!$F:$G, 2, FALSE)/10000

In my DMF Card calculator, my formula looks like this:

=VLOOKUP(A2, ‘[The Undermine Journal - H-Earthen Ring.xlsx]H-Earthen Ring’!$F:$G, 2, FALSE)/10000

For me, this returns a match for the item name in cell A2 when searching my pricing workbook, “The Undermine Journal – H-Earthen Ring.xlsx,” where my worksheet name is “H-Earthen Ring.” Columns F and G should represent the item names and market prices as returned by the IQY.

Sample Use to Determine Cost of Creating a Darkmoon Card of Mists

I multiply the market price value of each herb by 212 (135 for Fool’s cap) to determine the minimum price I should sell a card for given the current market price. Theoretically, I’m buying herbs below market price, so this value should already indicate a small profit.

Here’s an example of what my table looks like given the current market prices of herbs:

HERB M PRICE MILL VAL TOTAL COST
Green Tea Leaf 2.42 2.42 212 512.85
Rain Poppy 2.27 2.27 212 481.16
Desecrated Herb 2.48 2.48 212 525.70
Snow Lily 2.74 2.74 212 581.49
Silkweed 2.41 2.41 212 511.47
Fool’s Cap 4.25 2.85 135 573.75

The “MILL VAL” column is used to determine the milling value of Fool’s Cap when comparing the ink yield rate against the other herbs.

As you can see, it takes a decent investment just to make a single card. You also have to factor in the Scribe’s time to mill the herb, craft the inks, and diligence to make their Scroll of Wisdom each day.

You can use this method for just about every profession that makes use of raw materials to help you determine what you should sell your crafted item for at minimum. If you’re not someone that is interested in crafting, this can still be useful to you to determine whether or not an item is above or below cost.

One of my favorite gold-making routines in Cataclysm was shuffling ore. Even if you consider yourself to be an average gold-maker in World of Warcraft, I’m sure you’ve heard of the ore shuffle. In Mists of Pandaria, the ore shuffle has returned, but with high volatility. However, there are tools out there for you to use to help you decide on whether or not it’s worth your while to participate in this gold-making scheme.

The basics of ore shuffling has been covered many times over on the Internet. If you are still not familiar with how it works, you basically use your Jewelcrafter to prospect various types of ore, and perform certain tasks with the prospected materials to turn a profit. These tasks can be as simple as crafting a rare gem, or constructing an item for disenchanting or selling on the auction house.

The Golden Crusade released an excellent guide that includes a spreadsheet that will help you determine whether or not it is profitable for you to shuffle your ore. The instructions are detailed enough, but you’ll need to create an account with the Undermine Journal before you can access the market data for the particular realm you are trying to retrieve data for.

One point to note: the market data that you download and import into the Excel spreadsheet is not used to calculate your profit. It is only there as a reference for you so that you can determine what amount you are comfortable paying for the various types of ore.

So guides on the Internet are great and all, but what about reality? The Golden Crusade outlined sample results when using 100 stacks of Ghost Iron Ore at 200 gold a stack. At a cost of 20K gold, a profit of 4.3K gold was made. Sounds awesome, right? Yeah! However, instead of using the spreadsheet to speculate and calculate, I’ll be using actual values from the Earthen Ring (US) Horde market.

Here are the prices I paid for the ore using actual cost and market prices:

PRICE QTY PPI DATE
115 20 5.75 10/8/2012
115 20 5.75 10/8/2012
115 20 5.75 10/8/2012
115 20 5.75 10/8/2012
115 20 5.75 10/8/2012
109 20 5.45 10/8/2012
109 20 5.45 10/8/2012
109 20 5.45 10/8/2012
109 20 5.45 10/8/2012
109 20 5.45 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012
110 20 5.5 10/8/2012

This works out to a total of 25 stacks (500 ore) at a total cost of 2,770 gold (at 5.54 gold per ore). The Undermine Journal reported a market price of 5.95 per ore on October 8, 2012. So, in theory, I already made 205 gold based on buying the ore below market price. If I used the spreadsheet, though, I have a potential profit of 5,771 gold. Hooray! Wait, what? That’s not how it works? Okay.

So now it’s time to prospect! I will report back on my ore prospecting yields this week and break down the actual materials gained from the ore and compare them to the spreadsheet.